The Thrum Adventure

I started this year with a commitment to reduce the size of my stash and a fuzzy notion of attacking some knitting projects that I had never done before. I thought that I would like to learn how to do double knitting. Maybe some herringbone stitch. Definitely, thrummed mitts.

Mitts and cat.
It was cold this weekend so I worked steadily all day Sunday on the thrummed mitts and got them done. This is my son’s cat Daxter checking them out.

I was really motivated to knit some warmer mittens, and I’ve heard that thrummed mittens provide serious warmth. They just look so cool, they can felt and mold themselves to fit hands well, and then there is the insulation factor. My Raynaud’s has gotten worse over the last year and I have some concerns about digital ulcers. Nope. I don’t want one of those!! I need to be able to function in the cold without taking risks with my fingers.

Cat and roving.
My BKB Deb gave me this merino roving from Malibrigo. Perfect for thrummed mitts!

I found a promising pattern online, Warm Paws by Carol Ullmann, dug out some worsted weight yarn from the stash, and watched videos on YouTube to learn about knitting in thrums. Pretty straightforward, and the pattern gave excellent instructions too.

Loop of fiber.
The staple length of the merino in the roving was pretty long: 3″-4″. It was also pretty darn soft and lofty. I pulled off little strips about 6″ long and then folded them into loops.
Making a thrum.
Each loop was pinched in the middle to make a bow, and then twisted to hold it together. I quickly discovered that my thrums needed more handling to keep them from shedding on the mitten, so I added a little water to the center of the loop (where my fingers are gripping it) and then rubbed it briskly with a finger on the back of my hand or wrist to make the wool felt in the middle. Hey, I have scleroderma, and I can’t twist the loop between my fingers, but that would probably work for another person. 🙂
Thrums
The prepared thrums were pretty hardy once the middles were felted and I could make several ahead of time. In this shot you can see the felted middle in each thrum.
Inside of the mitt.
Once knitted into the mitt the loopy thrums stayed in place and behaved themselves.

The finished mitts are just fantastic and fit like a dream. I wore them as I drove home from my son’s last night in the cold and snow; my hands stayed warm and for the first time in a long while I didn’t have a Raynaud’s attack during the drive. I’m still researching battery operated warm mittens, but in the meantime these thrummed mitts are going to be a game changer for me. The way that merino felted so quickly I figure that I can just stuff more loops in to increase the insulation as needed. Here are my project notes.

So, how am I doing on my New Year’s resolutions? I can check thrummed knitting off my list, and with this project I have now removed 14 skeins of yarn from the stash. I’m pretty sure I will make the goal of reducing the stash by 50 skeins this year. Of course, not every project is quick to complete. Check out how I’m doing on the fabulous, colorful mitts (that would make a unicorn cry with envy…) that I’m making for my knitworthy niece…

Mitts
Those bobbles and braids are slowing me down, but look at how cool they are going to be!! Here are these project notes.

Happy knitting everyone, and I do hope that the weather is behaving for you.

Author: Midnight Knitter

I weave, knit and read in Aurora, Colorado where my garden lives. I have 2 sons, a knitting daughter-in-law, a grandson and two exceptionally spoiled cats.

16 thoughts on “The Thrum Adventure”

    1. I didn’t show how to knit the thrums in as the are great sources on YouTube that show how to do it, but it was really simple. The mitts for my niece really are taking time… the herringbone braids take a lot of time, but I am speeding up with practice!

  1. I love your thrummed mittens! Thank you for showing how you did the thrums. I’ve got yarn and fiber but have put off knitting the mittens for maybe 5 years. Now I feel more confident about giving them a go:)
    The mitts for your niece are going to be gorgeous! You’re so lucky to have a knitworthy person to knit for!

    1. There were several techniques on YouTube so I played around with thrum types. I think the double loops with the felted centers work the best so that’s what I showed in the pics. I’d love to see what you do.

  2. I’ve never heard of thrummed mitts. They’re beautiful and intriguing. What a fun project, too. Those mitts for your niece are stunning as well and make me long for your skills. Thanks for sharing such delightful cat photos. I’m glad you’re still knitting, even with all you have going on.

    1. I have to admit, these thrummed mitts are the first ones I’ve ever actually seen; I’ve seen pictures online and was intrigued. They are WARM!

      The mitts for my niece are really a stretch for me. At one point I was computer, two magazines and notes from the original source to work on them. The first one is now done, so things will be easier from now on.

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